With the Pink Line, Valérie Plante proposes a sustainable mobility plan to get Montreal moving

The new pink line will relieve the orange line and provide efficient public transit service to underserved areas

 

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In short

In recent years, the congestion of Montreal’s road and metro networks has steadily increased. The orange line is particularly problematic, as users are condemned to the sardine class because of an offer that is no longer sufficient to meet demand. Meanwhile, many Montreal neighborhoods still do not have access to the metro. Valérie Plante, Projet Montréal leader and Montreal mayoral candidate, proposes a vision to end the status quo and better connect Montreal neighbourhoods through a new diagonal metro line. The pink line will not only relieve the orange line, but will also serve many poorly serviced neighborhoods in Montreal. This new line, which will have 29 stations, will cross eight boroughs and significantly reduce travel times for residents.

 

Highlights

  • At least 521,000 Montrealers live within walking distance of one of the future stations on the pink line.
  • The pink line will reduce traffic congestion in Montreal, which costs up to $2.5 billion a year and causes Montreal drivers to lose an average of 26 million hours per year.
  • The pink line will significantly increase the capacity of the metro network to the city center.
  • The pink line will relieve the orange line, which currently works at full capacity during rush hour.
  • Between 2004 and 2014, the number of personal vehicles in Montreal almost doubled population growth.
  • No new metro station has been inaugurated in Montreal for nearly 30 years.
  • The pink line will stretch over three phases: study and planning, first stage of construction to connect Montréal-Nord to downtown, and then the final stage connecting it to Lachine.
  • According to the calculations carried out by the Polytechnique Mobility Chair using public data, the pink line will make it possible to significantly shorten travel time by public transport to the city center:
  • Montréal-Nord to downtown: 22 minutes (compared to 62 minutes currently)

Saint-Léonard to downtown: 16 minutes (compared to 55 minutes)
Vieux-Rosemont to downtown: 10 minutes (compared to 40 minutes)
Notre-Dame-de-Grâce to downtown: 8 minutes (compared to 27    minutes)
Lachine to downtown: 17 minutes (compared to 44 minutes)


Quotes

"Today we are presenting a sustainable mobility plan to meet the needs of today and tomorrow. It is an ambitious, bold plan that is necessary to increase the mobility of Montrealers and, as a result, increase productivity and reduce inequalities. We must offer Montrealers in neighborhoods that are currently underserved by public transit a reliable, fast and efficient alternative to travel. This is what we propose with the pink line.” - Valérie Plante, Leader of Projet Montréal and aspiring Mayor of Montréal

"The last inauguration of a new metro station in Montreal dates back nearly 30 years. Since then, more than 200,000 people have settled in Montreal and there are in excess of 915,000 personal vehicles. It's time to tackle congestion and provide Montrealers with new, effective and comfortable options to get around. At the moment, metropolises like Paris and Barcelona are investing in their public transit networks. It is time for Montreal to follow their lead.” - Sylvain Ouellet, Projet Montréal spokesperson for sustainable development

“It is time we have a mayor who unites Montrealers and our partners to create projects that have positive long term impacts. Projet Montréal has the political will to get things moving. We present this vision because the federal and provincial governments have also manifested this will to invest massively in public transit infrastructure. Montreal must not miss this window of opportunity.” - Craig Sauvé, Projet Montréal Transport Critic

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    commented on With the Pink Line, Valérie Plante proposes a sustainable mobility plan to get Montreal moving 2017-10-12 17:24:52 -0400
    I am curious how PM will succeed with this endeavour. From my understanding, the City has little control over the metro, with funding mostly coming from the province and CMM. How will PM get these two bodies to go along with this proposal? The project has an estimated $6bn price tag. I do like the idea of expanding the metro on the island, and on the surface, this proposal certainly sounds like a good idea, but the details have been lacking. Thanks.